Hawkes Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group

Media Releases

Get Ready Week – Natural Warning Signs
18 September 2014, 12.35pm

What would you do if a long or strong earthquake hit Hawke’s Bay right now?

During Get Ready Week [21-27 September] Hawke’s Bay people are urged to spend some time getting to know the natural warning signs of a tsunami following a large earthquake. Get Ready Week is a good opportunity to plan safe evacuation routes to higher ground or inland.

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Manager, Ian Macdonald says Hawke’s Bay’s location on the Pacific Ocean and at the edge of two tectonic plates means there are risks of tsunami from local, regional and distant sources.

“It is recognised the East Coast of New Zealand has the highest tsunami risk in the country, so we need to be sure what to do after a long or strong earthquake when there may be a subsequent local source tsunami,” says Mr Macdonald.

Mr Macdonald explains that knowing the natural warning signs can be key to saving lives. These are:

• Feeling a strong earthquake that makes it hard to stand up, or a weak rolling earthquake that lasts a minute or more
• Seeing a sudden rise or fall in sea level
• Hearing loud and unusual noises from the sea.

“If people are in a coastal area when they feel, see or hear any of these warnings, they need to move immediately to the nearest higher ground, or as far inland as possible and stay there.”

The Pacific Ocean has a history of generating damaging tsunami. Recently, large earthquakes in Chile (2010) Samoa (2009) and Tonga (2009) produced distant source tsunami which hit the east coast.

“Warnings of these distant-source tsunami come through the Ministry of Civil Defence and we have time to alert people if they need to get away from the coast. However if a tsunami starts close to shore, there will be no official warning because there is just no time. The only warning will be the earthquake itself.”

There are numerous active faults and folds off Hawke’s Bay that could produce earthquakes large enough to generate ‘near-source’ tsunami. Just 90 kilometres away is a deep undersea trench called the Hikurangi Trough, which is the line where the Pacific Plate slides under the Australia Plate. Earthquakes or landslides in this zone can displace huge amounts of energy and water which produce tsunami.


Schools ‘Get Ready’ with Shortest Ever Disaster Movies
18 September 2014, 12.30pm

The finalists in this year’s ‘Shortest Ever Disaster Movie’ competition run by Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence and Emergency Management have been selected.

The Shortest Ever Disaster Movie competition is part of Get Ready Week 21-27 September.

The competition encourages school students to use visual media to get a message across about the actions people need to take to be safe in a disaster.

There were 18 entries, 14 of which came from Central Hawke’s Bay schools.

“All the entries received showed good evidence of what to do in an emergency, which was the theme of this year’s competition,” says CDEM Group Controller Ian Macdonald.

Students needed to research a disaster topic and learn about the correct civil defence advice on what people should do in that disaster.

This year the topics the students chose were earthquakes, volcanic eruption, wild fires and flooding.

The finalists are:
Tamatea Intermediate – “A lesson in Earthquake Action”
Omakere School – “Taking us Higher” (about flooding)
Takapau School – “Earthquake Movie 2014”.

An overall winner will be announced at a prize-giving presentation next month.

The finalists’ videos are viewable on www.hbemergency.govt.nz and YouTube.

“Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group team thanks all the schools, students, parents and helpers for taking part in this competition and we’re pleased to see the enthusiasm for learning more about how to be safe in disasters,” says Mr Macdonald.

For more information on getting ready to get thru a civil defence emergency visit www.hbemergency.govt.nz or visit Hawke’s Bay Emergency on Facebook or Twitter.


Hawke’s Bay wide Civil Defence Plan helps region to be more prepared
7 July 2014, 11.00am

A new region-wide emergency management plan has been developed to help the Hawke’s Bay community be more prepared for a civil defence emergency.
The Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Plan has been developed over the last 18 months. It replaces the previous plan and takes a more region-wide approach to preparedness.

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Joint Committee Chairman Fenton Wilson says the plan covers the entire region from the Wairoa district to Central Hawke’s Bay and focuses on a more coordinated approach to planning for a civil defence emergency.

“The Group Plan has been primarily written to guide and inform those involved in civil defence planning in the region; however it also gives the public a good view of how hazards and risks in the region will be managed,” says Mr Wilson.
“We encourage people to find out more about the main hazards in the region and what they and their communities can do to prepare.”

The plan was developed with the help of Hawke’s Bay’s five councils, emergency services, central government and non-government partners, such as Red Cross.
Mr Wilson says the new plan incorporates lessons learnt from recent disasters, such as the Canterbury earthquakes and a 2010 review of Hawke’s Bay’s civil defence capability.

“The plan seeks to achieve a more resilient Hawke’s Bay through comprehensive emergency management that covers reducing the risk from hazards, community readiness for events, its response to a disaster and recovery from the impacts of a disaster.”
The plan is available at www.hbemergency.govt.nz .



Hawke’s Bay eases into Wet Week 
 
11 June 2014, 4.00pm  

Hawke’s Bay CDEM Group is coordinating with Hawkes’ Bay Regional Council on the likely impact of up to 300 ml of rain that may fall in the region by Friday.  

People in Hawke’s Bay should be aware of rising and variable river levels, particularly in low-lying areas with river access, such as Clive.  River access at Pakowhai Road’s Chesterhope Bridge has been closed for safety reasons.  

Operational teams expect an ‘annual scale’ rainfall event that will likely see full river channels and only minor impact on the urban pumping network.  

HBRC Incident Controller Darren Gorst is using this level of rainfall to perform a test of operational systems.  He is pleased that flood control and drainage contractors and land-leasees have already checked the readiness of the network and moved any stock that could be affected.  

“There is the possibility of localised flooding if we get a burst of heavy rain,” says Mr Gorst, “so to be safe our operational and pump maintenance teams will remain on call overnight.  This scale of annual event should not present too many problems.”  

The easterly wind conditions and associated swell may close river mouths and create some concern for seaside residents, however HBRC, CDEM Group and Council staff will continue to monitor the weather conditions.
 

Hawke's Bay people urged to be prepared in wake of quakes and tsunami in Chile2 April 2014 4.40pm

The spate of earthquakes earlier this week and the tsunami in Chile today is a timely reminder to Hawke’s Bay people to be prepared for an emergency.

New Zealand’s Tsunami Experts Panel says there is minimal threat posed to New Zealand by today’s 8.2 magnitude quake in Northern Chile. Only minimal tsunami waves (tens of centimetres) are expected to reach New Zealand shores around 2.30 tomorrow morning, which coincides with low tide.

Hawke’s Bay people are reminded they need to be prepared to look after themselves for three days when an emergency occurs.

Meanwhile, Napier Civil Defence Emergency Management will conduct its twice yearly public alert test on Sunday, 6 April. Sixteen sirens located around the city will sound at 12-noon (turn on and off) for approximately five minutes. The public alert test is a great reminder to replenish emergency survival kits, change stored water and check smoke alarm batteries.

For more information on getting ready to get thru a civil defence emergency visit www.hbemergency.govt.nz or visit Hawke’s Bay Emergency on Facebook or Twitter.



Storm Warning Update for Hawke’s Bay
14 March 2014 10.53am

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management has been monitoring the forecasts for Cyclone Lusi and the likely impacts for Hawke’s Bay are becoming clearer.

As the predicted track of Lusi has moved more to the west of the North Island, the potential swell for the Hawke’s Bay coast line has reduced to 2-5 metres.
Hawke’s Bay CDEM Group manager, Ian Macdonald says the size and nature of the swell this weekend means that people should still keep away from Hawke’s Bay beaches, however no serious wave damage is expected.

“Vulnerable coastal communities should still remain vigilant and prepared. Our focus is now on the wind and rain which will cause river systems to rise so people in upper catchment areas and the ranges need to be careful around rivers and creeks. There is also a likelihood of some surface flooding and slips around the region.”

The worst of the weather for Hawke’s Bay is expected over Saturday night and Sunday morning with a short period of heavy rain and wind.
“People still need to keep up to date with the latest weather forecast and be careful travelling over the weekend. Being a cyclone, the forecasted track of the weather system can change at short notice. Civil Defence will continue to monitor the situation over the weekend and are prepared to respond if necessary. If people are worried about their safety over the weekend they should call 111,” says Mr Macdonald.


Cyclone Lusi could impact on Hawke’s Bay
21 March 2014 5.17pm

Tropical Cyclone Lusi is forecast to impact on the upper North Island over this weekend. Based on current information Lusi is expected to arrive over northern New Zealand on Saturday or early Sunday, and then to track southwards over central New Zealand before moving out to sea east of the South Island on Monday. Based on current information the impacts on Hawke’s Bay are likely to be heavy swells rather than very high levels of wind and rain. This may change as the forecast firms up over the next few days.

Most likely scenario for Hawke’s Bay at the moment are large swells impacting on east and north facing coastlines and some periods of heavy rain. In particular the swells are expected to impact on the eastern coast of Mahia Peninsular, Bay View to Westshore beaches, Napier City beaches, Haumoana to Clifton and all coastal communities south of Cape Kidnappers. Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Manager Ian Macdonald says “Civil Defence has started implementing its notification systems for coastal communities likely to be affected. We will be monitoring the situation as it develops and if necessary implementing emergency contingency plans.”

“People living in coastal areas should keep up to date with official weather warnings and forecasts from MetService in the coming days. People should be cautious if they are going to be in coastal areas this weekend. It would not be a good weekend to be boating in Hawke Bay.”

Mr Macdonald said “We are encouraging people living in coastal areas to check their emergency plans and emergency survival items and getaway kit.” Detailed advice about what to do before, during and after a storm is at www.getthru.govt.nz.

Updates during an emergency can be found at www.hbemergency.govt.nz and on Facebook facebook.com/hbemergency.


Resilience Focus for HB Civil Defence Group Plan

22 November 2013

A draft plan for preparing and coping with natural hazards and emergencies in the region has been released for public comment by Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management (CDEM) Group.

2 April 2014 4.40pm The spate of earthquakes earlier this week and the tsunami in Chile today is a timely reminder to Hawke’s Bay people to be prepared for an emergency. New Zealand’s Tsunami Experts Panel says there is minimal threat posed to New Zealand by today’s 8.2 magnitude quake in Northern Chile. Only minimal tsunami waves (tens of centimetres) are expected to reach New Zealand shores around 2.30 tomorrow morning, which coincides with low tide. Hawke’s Bay people are reminded they need to be prepared to look after themselves for three days when an emergency occurs. Meanwhile, Napier Civil Defence Emergency Management will conduct its twice yearly public alert test on Sunday, 6 April. Sixteen sirens located around the city will sound at 12-noon (turn on and off) for approximately five minutes. The public alert test is a great reminder to replenish emergency survival kits, change stored water and check smoke alarm batteries. For more information on getting ready to get thru a civil defence emergency visit www.hbemergency.govt.nz or visit Hawke’s Bay Emergency on Facebook or Twitter. 14 March 2014 10.53am Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management has been monitoring the forecasts for Cyclone Lusi and the likely impacts for Hawke’s Bay are becoming clearer. As the predicted track of Lusi has moved more to the west of the North Island, the potential swell for the Hawke’s Bay coast line has reduced to 2-5 metres. Hawke’s Bay CDEM Group manager, Ian Macdonald says the size and nature of the swell this weekend means that people should still keep away from Hawke’s Bay beaches, however no serious wave damage is expected. “Vulnerable coastal communities should still remain vigilant and prepared. Our focus is now on the wind and rain which will cause river systems to rise so people in upper catchment areas and the ranges need to be careful around rivers and creeks. There is also a likelihood of some surface flooding and slips around the region.” The worst of the weather for Hawke’s Bay is expected over Saturday night and Sunday morning with a short period of heavy rain and wind. “People still need to keep up to date with the latest weather forecast and be careful travelling over the weekend. Being a cyclone, the forecasted track of the weather system can change at short notice. Civil Defence will continue to monitor the situation over the weekend and are prepared to respond if necessary. If people are worried about their safety over the weekend they should call 111,” says Mr Macdonald. 21 March 2014 5.17pmTropical Cyclone Lusi is forecast to impact on the upper North Island over this weekend. Based on current information Lusi is expected to arrive over northern New Zealand on Saturday or early Sunday, and then to track southwards over central New Zealand before moving out to sea east of the South Island on Monday. Based on current information the impacts on Hawke’s Bay are likely to be heavy swells rather than very high levels of wind and rain. This may change as the forecast firms up over the next few days. Most likely scenario for Hawke’s Bay at the moment are large swells impacting on east and north facing coastlines and some periods of heavy rain. In particular the swells are expected to impact on the eastern coast of Mahia Peninsular, Bay View to Westshore beaches, Napier City beaches, Haumoana to Clifton and all coastal communities south of Cape Kidnappers. Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Manager Ian Macdonald says “Civil Defence has started implementing its notification systems for coastal communities likely to be affected. We will be monitoring the situation as it develops and if necessary implementing emergency contingency plans.” “People living in coastal areas should keep up to date with official weather warnings and forecasts from MetService in the coming days. People should be cautious if they are going to be in coastal areas this weekend. It would not be a good weekend to be boating in Hawke Bay.” Mr Macdonald said “We are encouraging people living in coastal areas to check their emergency plans and emergency survival items and getaway kit.” Detailed advice about what to do before, during and after a storm is at www.getthru.govt.nz. Updates during an emergency can be found at and on Facebook . 22 November 2013 A draft plan for preparing and coping with natural hazards and emergencies in the region has been released for public comment by Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management (CDEM) Group.

 

Every five years the CDEM Group is required to provide a plan proposing the civil defence work and community action that will be taken to prepare, respond and recover from adverse events and disasters, such as earthquakes, floods and tsunami.

Resilience is a major theme in the HB CDEM Draft Plan, which outlines plans to strengthen the communities’ resilience to adverse events and disasters.

“Resilience is our ability to bounce back, and much of that depends on the community’s willingness to be well-prepared. Individuals and communities may have good ideas how we can help them to do that better and we’d like to hear from them,” says HBCDEM Group Controller Ian Macdonald.

To make it easier for people to make comments, a form is included in the HBRC magazine Our Place which is being distributed to all homes in Hawke’s Bay this week.

“The Plan has been presented in a pretty straightforward way and talks about the risks we face, how we can reduce the risk, be ready, respond and recover from an emergency. It outlines the activities we plan to undertake so we can do this effectively.”

One element included in the draft plan is better training and coordination of volunteers, and how to provide for spontaneous volunteers during an emergency, a new factor that has arisen after the huge response to volunteering following the Christchurch earthquakes.

Public submissions close on 13 December.  A copy of the complete draft plan and submission form is on www.hbemergency.govt.nz.

In Hawke’s Bay, civil defence and emergency management is delivered to the community through a Group structure.  Every council is required to be a member of the Group which consists of the Hawke’s Bay Regional, Wairoa District, Hastings District, Napier City, and Central Hawke’s Bay District Councils. The HBCDEM Group has collective responsibility for the delivery of emergency management and planning within Hawke’s Bay.  There are 16 CDEM Groups across New Zealand.



Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Re-sets the Tsunami Risk
30 September 2013

A revised report by GNS Science has upgraded the risk to Hawke’s Bay from a large scale tsunami event but the new information is no cause for alarm, according to Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management (CDEM) Group.

HB CDEM Group staff have studied the Review of Tsunami Hazard in New Zealand report, just released by GNS Science.

While the possible impact to the Hawke’s Bay coastline from a 1-in-2500-year tsunami has been revised up in some areas and down for others, the national modelling is not a cause for added concern. It has raised the effect of a large-scale tsunami from the original 8-10 metres to 10-12 metres along some parts of the coastline.

HB CDEM Group Controller Ian Macdonald has a pragmatic response.

“We’re talking about an extremely unlikely event, but one which we must be prepared for,” says Mr Macdonald.

“The updated GNS Science report is good information and we’ll use it to update our models, review our plans and adjust our response.”

In 2011, the HBCDEM Group, working with Hawke’s Bay Regional Council, released new maps showing the predicted level of inundation from a 10 metre wave. The difference in the effect of a wave with an average predicted height of 12 metres in some areas over a 10 metre wave does not substantially change the impact and the planning for such an event. Staff will now revise inundation maps, using the new information, to assist with contingency planning.

Information on what Hawke’s Bay people need to do to plan for and respond to a tsunami is on CDEM Group website www.hbemergency.govt.nz
> Hazards Information > Tsunami.


Neighbours important in a Civil Defence emergency
25 September 2013

Having a cuppa with your neighbour might not seem like a big deal, but it could ultimately lead to you and your neighbour helping each other get through a Civil Defence emergency. 

23-29 September is Get Ready Week and Hawke’s Bay people are being urged to take some time to get to know their neighbours as part of their plan to be prepared should disaster strike.

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Manager, Ian Macdonald says in a civil defence emergency neighbours play an important role.

“They can alert you of imminent danger, communicate information you may not have heard and even share power or supplies,” says Mr Macdonald.

He says neighbours are even more important for the elderly and disabled in our community, who rely on various networks for information.

Mr Macdonald says there are numerous ways of getting to know your neighbours including:

Baking – This is always a good ice breaker and elderly neighbours are very grateful for the gesture. While chatting you could mention your household plans for a Civil Defence emergency and ask what they have planned and see where you can help each other. Does your neighbour have some good amenities which can be shared in times of need?

Plan Sharing – You could write a letter and drop it in nearby letterboxes letting neighbours know your plans and what you’d like to achieve with their help.

Street BBQ – You could hold a street BBQ in a near-by park and discuss your emergency plans in a neutral, relaxed environment.

Neighbourhood Support – You could start or join a Neighbourhood Support group in your area. These have proved hugely successful where they have already been established.

Mr Macdonald says its important neighbourhoods find their own way of communicating their Civil Defence emergency plans.

“After the Christchurch earthquakes it showed communities that had strong neighbourhood support networks recovered quicker than those where people went it alone.”

For more information about Civil Defence preparation phone your local Civil Defence office, visit www.hbemergency.govt.nz, ‘Like’ us on Facebook or ‘follow’ us on Twitter


Public alert systems tested on week day
25 September 2013

Napier and Hastings Civil Defence are teaming up once again to test their public alerting systems on Friday 27 September 2013.

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence selected a week day to test the public alert systems to give businesses and schools the opportunity to test their own emergency systems.

In Napier the sirens will sound (turn on and off) at 11am for approximately five minutes.

In the Hastings district, the mobile alerting equipment called “stingers” will be tested between 11am and 1pm in Flaxmere. You should hear the Civil Defence sting and then a voice message advising you what to do. The stingers will be tested in other areas of the Hastings District over time.

While Napier and Hastings operate different alerting systems the actions that you should take are the same.

Upon hearing the alerts, you should tune in to a radio station which is listed on the website below. A Civil Defence message will be broadcast.

Following the sounding of the alerts, you are asked to complete a questionnaire which will be available at www.hbemergency.govt.nz. Completing the survey automatically enters you into a draw where you could win some great prizes.

There are no assurances that everyone will hear the alerts, as any number of factors may reduce their effectiveness. Other loud noises, wind, distance from the siren, elevation and topography may affect your ability to hear the signals.

It is important that residents and visitors to Napier and Hastings don’t become alarmed or frightened when the alerts sound. You should be sure that your neighbours are aware that the test will take place.

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Manager, Ian Macdonald, says it is important that people are aware of what we can’t warn for including earthquakes, hazardous substance events, fires or a local source tsunami.

“If there is a strong earthquake that makes it hard to stand up or lasts longer than a minute you should evacuate immediately – not wait for an official warning or public alert,” Ian says. “Other natural warnings for a local source tsunami include strange sea behaviour, the water level suddenly rising or falling or if you hear a loud or unusual noise from the sea.”

The test is also a reminder that you should replenish your emergency survival kit, change your stored water, ensure your household plan and getaway kit is up-to-date and check your smoke alarm batteries.

Whatever you do, now is the time to prepare for any disaster. Are you ready?

For more information see:

www.napier.govt.nz
www.hastingsdc.govt.nz
www.hbemergency.govt.nz or
www.fire.org.nz  

Alternatively phone your local Council.


Short disaster movies big on creativity 
17 September 2013

A judging panel has awarded Takapau School 1st and 3rd place from the 17 movies entered in this year’s Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management (CDEM) Group’s Shortest Ever Disaster Movie competition, promoting the Civil Defence message of “preparedness”.

‘Drop, Cover, Hold’ was the winning entry from Takapau Primary School, with ‘Swallowed by the Sea’ winning 3rd place for the talented school. ‘Tsunami Rap’ was an innovative entry from Havelock North Intermediate, which took 2nd place.

The competition runs every two years, and this year’s number of entries was a big step up from the 7 films entered in 2011.

Hawke’s Bay CDEM Group Manager Ian Macdonald was impressed with the quality and variety of this year’s entries, saying “It’s a good reflection on the schools that enter. These movies show off the creative talent of the students and staff, sometimes involving the whole school and community.”

Ian added, “This is a fun way to learn about and promote the “preparedness” message, not forgetting the work which goes into writing, planning, filming and editing a movie.”

Other schools that took part this year were Taradale High School, Napier Girls’ High School, Tamatea Intermediate, Waipawa Primary School and Omakere School.

For their good work, Takapau School takes away a new BBQ, a wind-up multi-function torch for all movie participants and a flip camera for the school. Havelock Intermediate win a video camera and tripod for their school.

The winning movies will also be aired on TV Hawke’s Bay, and are available on YouTube:
Takapau School - Drop, Cover, Hold
Havelock Intermediate - Tsunami Rap
Takapau School - Swallowed by the Sea

Earthquake a reminder to be prepared
24 July 2013

Hawke’s Bay people should be using the Cook Strait earthquakes as a reminder to check they have done all they can to be prepared for a large earthquake to affect them.

Hawkes’ Bay can expect an earthquake of the strength that impacted Seddon and Wellington every 6 - 15 years. Hawke’s Bay has a number of fault lines running through it, any one of which could rupture and cause damage.

Over the past 20 years, Hawke’s Bay has had five earthquakes over 5 on the Richter scale, such as the Hastings 5.9 earthquake on 25 August 2008 when residents experienced strong shaking measured at around 6 on the Modified Mercalli (MM) scale. EQC paid out over $2 million to insured residential households.

Scientists warn us to expect stronger earthquakes at any time in the future. If a larger earthquake was to occur close to one of our towns or cities, we could see damage to property, buildings and infrastructure similar to what has happened this week.

“Everyone in Hawke’s Bay should be well prepared with stored water and food, first aid kits and a way to cook if power is out for any length of time,” says Ian Macdonald, Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Group Manager.

A recent resident survey across the region asked 700 people how prepared they were for emergencies. Civil Defence Emergency Management staff are pleased that the survey has recorded a generally high level of water and food stored. However there is a lower number of emergency plans in place.

“It’s great to know that more Hawke’s Bay people know they can cope well with water and food and it would be good to see more people with their emergency planning in place,” says Ian.

“An emergency plan should be essential as it gives you more control on what happens to you and your family during and after an event. It’s as simple as talking over so everyone knows what to do, where to shelter safely or meet up if you are away from home.”

“Also practice an evacuation from your home. It might seem silly to do, but after a confusing earthquake that practice will be worth it when it saves you time and possibly injuries,” says Ian.

Another part of emergency planning is linking in with social media. This is increasingly important in an emergency and will be used along with radio reports, news releases, fliers and direct contact where appropriate. The Hawke’s Bay Emergency Facebook Page and Twitter feed also include important updates such as planned siren testing and helpful tips on preparing for an emergency. The links are - Twitter: @hbemergency and Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/hbemergency.

Get ready for an Earthquake

• Quake safe your home and work place. As well securing bookcases, pictures, chimneys, hot water cylinders and cabinets, also secure your modern flat screen TVs - these are particularly dangerous and caused deaths in Christchurch and injuries in Wellington when they fell on top of people.

• Have an emergency plan for yourself and your family. Talk over with your family, including children, and plan what you should do if an earthquake strikes at night or when you are work with children at school. Identify and show your family safe places within your home. Practice the earthquake drill and evacuating your home with your family.

• Get to know your neighbours. After an earthquake your neighbours will become an important part of getting you and your street back to normal.

• Have an emergency kit with at least 3 days water and food, a battery radio, a torch and a first aid kit. Think about what other essential items you may need, e.g. baby food, disposable nappies and medicines.

• Have a ‘getaway bag’ in case you need to leave home or work at short notice. A spare backpack with old sneakers (if roads are damaged, you may have to walk a long way), water, food bars, battery radio, torch and warm clothing could be useful.

For more advice on being prepared go to www.getthru.govt.nz.



HEAVY RAIN THIS WEEKEND IN HAWKE'S BAY?
12 July 2013

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management (CDEM) Group advises locals to keep their umbrella and gumboots handy this weekend, while the weather forecasts vary from heavy rain to blue skies.

After a damp, squally week in Hawke’s Bay, with offshore swells stirring up the coastline, Hawke’s Bay is due for more periods of heavy rain. This is expected from today and to continue at times through the weekend.

Welcome breaks in the rain on Thursday and Friday mean that low-lying areas and the region’s rivers have had some time to drain, but that ground in many parts of the region is now saturated. Further rain will lead to quick changes in river levels, with surface flooding and slips more likely.

Coastal swells will also continue through the weekend. A northeast swell rises to 3 metres this afternoon and to 4.5 metres Saturday night, tending easterly Sunday before easing on Monday. A southerly swell is expected to rise to 3.5 metres Sunday night, lift to 4.5 metres on Monday, and then ease Tuesday.

HB CDEM Group Manager Ian Macdonald confirms that council and support agency staff continue to monitor the situation and will advise if there is any significant change.

Links:
twitter: @hbemergency
facebook: http://www.facebook.com/hbemergency



GUSTY WINDS AND BURSTY RAIN IN THE BAY
11 July 2013

Gusty winds and bursty rainfall kept some Hawke’s Bay people awake overnight.  The simple message from Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group is “take care”.

The current and forecast situation is being carefully monitored by the regional, city and district councils with this current pattern of weather expected to continue until early Friday. The wet weather is predicted to ease off Friday but then return on Saturday for a wet weekend.

HB CDEM Group Manager Ian Macdonald advises that drainage systems on the Heretaunga Plains are coping well.

“Indications are that some of the region’s rivers may get up to a 1-in-5 year river level, with a second wet weather system expected over the weekend. River levels will rise and fall quickly, and wet ground will makes slips more likely,” said Mr Macdonald.

The bulk of wet weather experienced Wednesday and into Thursday was south of Tutira and into Central Hawke’s Bay.  Napier experienced 73mm rainfall over the last 24 hour period to 8am, with Hastings getting receiving similar at 76mm.  Rainfall at Tukipo in Central Hawke’s Bay was recorded at 107.5mm over the last 24 hours.

Seas are stormy, with an easterly swell of 3-6 metres expected Thursday and Friday, swinging south-easterly on Sunday/ Monday.

Mr Macdonald has no significant concerns at this stage, but says, “The weather system modelling is quite changeable so please keep up to date with the latest forecasts and be sure to check road conditions before travelling.” 

HB CDEM Group continues to monitor the situation and will advise if there is any significant change.

Links:
twitter:      @hbemergency
facebook: http://www.facebook.com/hbemergency

 


 

CAUTION: WET WEEK AHEAD
10 July 2013

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group urges caution in the current weather conditions.

Weather forecasts being monitored by Hawke’s Bay CDEM Group shows that heavy rainfall is expected around Napier and Hastings as well as southern Hawke’s Bay from midday today through to late Thursday.  Wet conditions are then expected to ease off but return on Saturday for a wet weekend.

Hawke’s Bay Regional Council is in contact with Napier City Council and Hastings District Council, watching the weather at this early stage and keeping an eye on the region’s flood and water management resources.

Hawke’s Bay CDEM Group asks people in the region to keep an eye on weather forecasts and roading information before leaving home or the office, and to be prepared ‘just in case’.

Being prepared means gas in the tank, first aid kits and blanket/s in cars.  People who are travelling should also carry extra food and ensure others are aware of their travel plans, particularly travel timing.

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Group Manager Ian Macdonald advises caution and common sense.

“We are going to wait and see what happens, but the main message is use your common sense,” said Mr Macdonald.

Further updates will be issued by HB CDEM Group as the weather develops.


HAWKE'S BAY PEOPLE URGED TO 'GET READY' THROUGH SOCIAL MEDIA
22 March 2013

Hawke’s Bay people are being encouraged to link to the Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management (HB CDEM) Group using social media.

HBCDEM Group, which is made up of Napier City, Hastings, Wairoa and Central Hawke’s Bay Distinct Councils and the Hawke’s Bay Regional Council, is launching itself onto the social media stage as another way of keeping in touch with people.

It wants people to go online and ‘like’ its new Facebook page – hbemergency and follow HB Emergency on Twitter. Both Twitter and Facebook compliments the Group website – hbemergency.govt.nz

HBCDEM Group Manager Ian Macdonald says the Christchurch Earthquake highlighted the importance of social media in an emergency.

“After the Christchurch quake many people turned to social media to find out what was happening and where to get assistance. Those who were connected to social media then passed on information within their neighbourhood,” says Mr Macdonald.

“By linking into our social media pages now people will be regularly updated and also connected in the event of an emergency.  The same social media will be used by all councils for emergencies, whether they are small scale or affect the wider region”

The Hawke’s Bay Emergency Facebook Page and Twitter feed will include important updates such as planned siren testing and helpful tips on preparing for an emergency.

In an emergency social media provides another contact point, and will be used along with radio reports, news releases, flyers and direct contact where appropriate.

Links:
twitter: @hbemergency
facebook: http://www.facebook.com/hbemergency



HB CIVIL DEFENCE ALERTING SYSTEMS PUT TO TEST
21 March 2013

Napier and Hastings Civil Defence are teaming up to test their public alerting systems on Sunday 7th April 2013, the day we also turn our clocks back at the end of daylight saving.

 

While Napier and Hastings operate different alerting systems the actions that you should take are the same.

In Napier the sirens will sound (turn on and off) at 12-noon for approximately five minutes. 

In the Hastings district, the mobile alerting equipment called “stingers” will be tested between 11am and 1pm in Whirinaki, Clive, Whakatu, Haumoana, Te Awanga, Clifton and Waimarama.  You should hear the Civil Defence sting and then a voice message advising you what to do. 

Upon hearing the alerts, you should turn on your radio and listen to a Hawke’s Bay radio station. A Civil Defence message will be broadcast. In the Hastings coastal areas you should also follow the instructions broadcast in the stinger message.

Following the sounding of the alerts, you are asked to complete a questionnaire which will be available at www.hbemergency.co.nz, in local community newspapers and in the mailbox in residents in the Hastings alerting areas. There are some great prizes to be won!

There are no assurances that everyone will hear the alerts, as any number of factors may reduce their effectiveness. Other loud noises, wind, distance from the siren, elevation and topography may affect your ability to hear the signals.

It is important that residents and visitors to Napier and Hastings don’t become alarmed or frightened when the alerts sound. You should be sure that your neighbours are aware that the test will take place.

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Manager, Ian Macdonald, says it is important that people are aware of what we can’t warn for including earthquakes, hazardous substance events, fires or a local source tsunami.

“If there is a strong earthquake that makes it hard to stand up or lasts longer than a minute you should evacuate immediately – not wait for an official warning or public alert,” Ian says. “Other natural warnings for a local source tsunami include strange sea behaviour, the water level suddenly rising or falling or if you hear a loud or unusual noise from the sea.”

The test is also a reminder that you should replenish your emergency survival kit, change your stored water, ensure your household plan and getaway kit is up-to-date and check your smoke alarm batteries.

Whatever you do, now is the time to prepare for any disaster. Are you ready?

For more information see:

 www.napier.govt.nz,

www.hastingsdc.govt.nz,

www.hbemergency.govt.nz or

www.fire.org.nz

 Alternatively phone your local Council.


HAWKE'S BAY MARINE - ONLY TSUNAMI THREAT

6 February, 4.45pm

 

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group advises coastal water users to be expecially alert if they’re on the water during the evening of Waitangi Day.

A tsunami threat for New Zealand has been advised as a result of a magnitude 8.0 earthquake in the Santa Cruz Islands at 2.14pm this afternoon.

GNS have adivsed the impact of this distant offshore earthquake poses only a marine threat within Hawke’s Bay.  Coastal surges of between 20 centimetres and 1 metre are expected from 6-7pm tonight, Wednesday 6th February.

Please note that harbours can amplify the effect of surge waves, so people in Ahuriri marina, for 
example, should take care in and around the water. 

People at the coastline should also take appropriate precautions, and keep up to date using the radio.



Tongariro eruption no significant threat for Hawke’s Bay
21 November, 3.40pm
Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group says there is no significant threat from this afternoon’s volcanic eruption at Mount Tongariro.

GNS Science confirmed the eruption, at the Te Maari crater, happened shortly after 1.20pm. It is the second eruption on the mountain this year; an eruption on August 6 was the first on Tongariro for more than 100 years.

There is no connection between the activity on Mt Tongariro and Mt Ruapehu.

Hawke’s Bay CDEM Group Controller Ian Macdonald advises, “We’re monitoring this situation and working with Ministry staff from Wellington and GNS.

He says the ash is falling in a north-easterly direction and Hawke’s Bay is not expected to be affected by it.

There has been some disruption to domestic flights around the country and those travelling are being advised to contact their airline for more details.


More than 46,900 in Hawke’s Bay take part in today’s national earthquake drill

More than 46,900 Hawke’s Bay people took part in New Zealand’s biggest ever earthquake drill, New Zealand ShakeOut at 9.26 this morning.

Nationally more than 1.3 million people did the “Drop, Cover and Hold” earthquake drill at 9:26-26:9 (9:26am on 26 September 2012).

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Manager Ian Macdonald says that is a great result for Hawke’s Bay.

“The goal was to have 35,000 Hawke’s Bay people take part and we’ve exceeded that target by over 10,000. In fact on a portion of population basis, Hawke’s Bay had the second highest number of participants, behind the Wellington region,” says Mr Macdonald.

He is encouraging those who took part today to upload their photos of people performing the drill to upload them to the ShakeOut website (www.getthru.govt.nz) and be in the draw to win some great prizes that will help them prepare for an emergency, like solar powered torches.

Mr Macdonald says the earthquake drill has been the focal point of New Zealand ShakeOut because it is a clear, simple action that people can take to help prepare them for an earthquake.

“It is also a first step, and we are encouraging people to look at their preparedness in more detail, including their emergency kits, getaway bags and family plans.”


One week until Shakeout and Hawke's Bay reaches its target
19 September 2012

Just one week until New Zealand’s largest ever earthquake drill – Exercise Shakeout and Hawke’s Bay has reached its target of having more than 35,000 locals taking part.

As of today more than 36,300 Hawke’s Bay people have registered to ‘Drop, Cover and Hold’ at 9.26am on Wednesday 26 September.

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Manager Ian Macdonald is delighted with the number of Hawke’s Bay people who’ve already registered for Shakeout, and is hoping more will sign up before next Wednesday.

“There is still time for others to register, and it’s easy. Simply visit the Shakeout website and it’ll take two minutes to sign up,” says Mr Macdonald.

The earthquake drill is the focal point of New Zealand ShakeOut because it is a clear, simple action that people can take to help prepare them for an earthquake. It is also a first step, and encourages people to look at their preparedness in more detail.

People can register at www.getthru.govt.nz

 

25,500 in Hawke’s Bay participating in national earthquake drill
Monday 27 August

As of today, more than 25,500 Hawke’s Bay people have signed up to take part in New Zealand’s biggest ever earthquake drill, New Zealand ShakeOut.

Nationally the aim is to have one million people do the “Drop, Cover and Hold” earthquake drill at 9:26-26:9 (9:26am on 26 September 2012) and in Hawke’s Bay the goal is 35,000!

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Manager Ian Macdonald says with just a month to go until the drill the region is well on the way to its target, but there is still a way to go to reach 35,000.

He says Napier is currently leading the charge with nearly 9,800 residents registered to take part, while Hastings is a close second with just over 9,000 signed up.

The 9:26-26:9 earthquake drill is the focal point of New Zealand ShakeOut because it is a clear, simple action that people can take to help prepare themselves for an earthquake. It is also a first step, and it encourages people to look at their preparedness in more detail.

Getting involved in Shakeout is as easy as 1, 2, 3!

1. Sign up now – go to www.getthru.govt.nz (it takes only two minutes).
2. Spread the word (share with friends, family and workmates via word of mouth, Facebook, Twitter, email and other methods).
3. Do the drill Drop, Cover and Hold drill on 9:26-26:9.


 

MEIDA ADVISORY

Be prepared if Mount Tongariro Erupts
Monday 13 August

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group is advising people in the region to be prepared for possible further eruptions and ash fall from Mount Tongariro.

Agencies including Police, Fire, Ambulance, District Health Board, Unison and Civil Defence met on Friday and have agreed to a plan should the current state on Mount Tongariro escalate.

GNS has advised more eruptions are possible, but the impact on Hawke’s Bay is likely to be ash fall to a depth of 2-3 millimetres. While this sounds minimal, any amount of ash fall can have an impact, as volcanic ash is toxic.

HBCDEM Group Manager Ian Macdonald says ash fall can aggravate respiratory conditions, getting into the eyes and mouth. It can create discomfort for pets and be poisonous to stock. Volcanic ash is also abrasive and can affect outdoor mechanical and electronic equipment.

“We encourage people to consider how ash fall might affect them and take action now so that they are prepared,” says Ian Macdonald.

Advice on how to prepare for volcanic ash fall can be found at the Hawke’s Bay CDEM website – www.hbemergency.govt.nz.

Farmers and horticulturalists should be familiar with information on the Ministry for Primary Industries website http://www.mpi.govt.nz, MPI’s Adverse Event Volcanic Impact document, and consider how ash fall could impact their operations.

 

 


 

Thursday 9th August

Tongariro eruption ash analysis
For all farmers in Waikato, Bay of Plenty, Rotorua-Taupo, Taranaki, Ruapehu, Tararua, Wanganui, Gisborne-Wairoa, Manawatu-Rangitikei, Hawke’s Bay and Wairarapa

Initial analysis of ash confirms no current human-health or agricultural threat beyond the immediate vicinity of the volcano
Initial analysis of ash produced from the 6 August 2012 eruption from Mt. Tongariro has shown moderate levels of soluble Fluorine (F).

The measurements were made by Massey University’s Volcanic Risk Solutions and the Fertiliser and Lime Research Centre, together with University of Canterbury researchers on ash samples collected near the volcano beside State Highways 46 and 1, along with one sample collected from Gisborne.

Concentrations between 20 and 70 mgF/kg of ash were measured, which is in a similar range to the widespread volcanic ash produced during the 1995 and 1996 eruptions of Ruapehu. Due to the restricted distribution and very thin ash fall, this currently poses no current human-health or agricultural threat beyond the immediate vicinity of the volcano.

In addition, heavy rainfall since the eruption has removed much of the ash and associated contaminants.

If future, larger eruptions of Mt. Tongariro produce ash with similar concentrations of Fluorine, a significant agricultural hazard can be anticipated:
The impact of ashfall on pastoral grazing systems is the covering of pasture, meaning it is ingested by grazing sheep, cattle and deer. Further, livestock drinking water in open troughs may be contaminated. Additionally, rural dwellers with roof-catchment drinking water sources should be vigilant to avoid ash runoff into water tanks. During and immediately following ashfall, the intake pipe to water tanks should be disconnected until ash has washed off the roof with rain.

In grazed pastoral systems, following ash cover, some livestock will be put-off grazing due to high levels of acidic and abrasive ash, while others will continue to graze. If supplementary feed is unavailable, this may lead to starvation of stock, especially pregnant or lambing/calving stock facing high energy demands at this time of year. If significant ash is ingested along with pasture, livestock are also at risk of the disease fluorosis.

Experience from the 1995/1996 eruptions has shown that ash coverings of >2 mm, low-grazed pastures, and low rainfall following ash deposition are critical factors increasing hazard. Deaths of stock normally begin 4-10 days after ashfall if no supplementary feed is available. Heavy or persistent rainfall quickly disperses such levels of ash and also rapidly leaches the F; reducing the hazard considerably.

In general Deer are likely to be the most susceptible to Fluorosis, followed by cattle, with sheep being the most resistant. Fluoride is adsorbed rapidly by grazing animals from ingested ash or contaminated water. In moderate levels of excess, it does not pass into milk.

Latest mitigation advice to farmers in the event of future ashfall is as follows:
1. If ashfall exceeds 2 mm or coats >50 percent of pasture/feed crops, either move stock to less affected areas of the farm or supply supplementary feed
2. In these situations refill stock drinking troughs from bore or river supplies.
3. If ash has not washed off pastures after 2-3 days, raise the quantity of supplementary feed and monitor stock condition closely
4. In general, to reduce impacts from ashfall, maintain pasture length by regular rotation rather than close cropping. Longer pastures are less likely to be completely covered.

For rural residents with roof-fed tank water supplies:
1. Temporarily remove downpipe connections to water tanks during and following ashfall to protect stored water
2. If possible, wait until rainfall clears ash from roofs before reconnecting intake
3. Water affected by ash will appear turbid (cloudy) and may have a bitter taste. If this is the case, avoid drinking this water and seek alternative supplies.

For more information:
Professor Shane Cronin of Volcanic Risk Solutions (021 228 9882 or 06 356 9099 x7207)

Professor Mike Hedley of the Fertiliser and Lime Research Centre (06 356 9099 x7419)

Dr Thomas Wilson, Natural Hazards Research Centre, Geological Sciences, University of Canterbury, 021 434 596

Online resources:
Civil Defence New Zealand information

Volcanic monitoring in New Zealand by Geonet

Volcanic Ash: Effects and Mitigation strategies (Agriculture) by the USGS

Impacts of volcanic eruptions on agriculture, horticulture and forestry and potential mitigation measures by the MPI

Health hazards of volcanic ash and guidelines on household preparedness before, during and after an ash fall by IVHHN

 
Thursday 9th AugustInitial analysis of ash produced from the 6 August 2012 eruption from Mt. Tongariro has shown moderate levels of soluble Fluorine (F). The measurements were made by Massey University’s Volcanic Risk Solutions and the Fertiliser and Lime Research Centre, together with University of Canterbury researchers on ash samples collected near the volcano beside State Highways 46 and 1, along with one sample collected from Gisborne. Concentrations between 20 and 70 mgF/kg of ash were measured, which is in a similar range to the widespread volcanic ash produced during the 1995 and 1996 eruptions of Ruapehu. Due to the restricted distribution and very thin ash fall, this currently poses no current human-health or agricultural threat beyond the immediate vicinity of the volcano. In addition, heavy rainfall since the eruption has removed much of the ash and associated contaminants. The impact of ashfall on pastoral grazing systems is the covering of pasture, meaning it is ingested by grazing sheep, cattle and deer. Further, livestock drinking water in open troughs may be contaminated. Additionally, rural dwellers with roof-catchment drinking water sources should be vigilant to avoid ash runoff into water tanks. During and immediately following ashfall, the intake pipe to water tanks should be disconnected until ash has washed off the roof with rain. In grazed pastoral systems, following ash cover, some livestock will be put-off grazing due to high levels of acidic and abrasive ash, while others will continue to graze. If supplementary feed is unavailable, this may lead to starvation of stock, especially pregnant or lambing/calving stock facing high energy demands at this time of year. If significant ash is ingested along with pasture, livestock are also at risk of the disease fluorosis. Experience from the 1995/1996 eruptions has shown that ash coverings of >2 mm, low-grazed pastures, and low rainfall following ash deposition are critical factors increasing hazard. Deaths of stock normally begin 4-10 days after ashfall if no supplementary feed is available. Heavy or persistent rainfall quickly disperses such levels of ash and also rapidly leaches the F; reducing the hazard considerably. In general Deer are likely to be the most susceptible to Fluorosis, followed by cattle, with sheep being the most resistant. Fluoride is adsorbed rapidly by grazing animals from ingested ash or contaminated water. In moderate levels of excess, it does not pass into milk. 1. If ashfall exceeds 2 mm or coats >50 percent of pasture/feed crops, either move stock to less affected areas of the farm or supply supplementary feed 2. In these situations refill stock drinking troughs from bore or river supplies. 3. If ash has not washed off pastures after 2-3 days, raise the quantity of supplementary feed and monitor stock condition closely 4. In general, to reduce impacts from ashfall, maintain pasture length by regular rotation rather than close cropping. Longer pastures are less likely to be completely covered. 1. Temporarily remove downpipe connections to water tanks during and following ashfall to protect stored water 2. If possible, wait until rainfall clears ash from roofs before reconnecting intake 3. Water affected by ash will appear turbid (cloudy) and may have a bitter taste. If this is the case, avoid drinking this water and seek alternative supplies. Professor Shane Cronin of Volcanic Risk Solutions (021 228 9882 or 06 356 9099 x7207) Professor Mike Hedley of the Fertiliser and Lime Research Centre (06 356 9099 x7419) Dr Thomas Wilson, Natural Hazards Research Centre, Geological Sciences, University of Canterbury, 021 434 596

 


 

Volcanic eruption threat has passed for now
7 August 2012, 2.30pm
Hawke’s Bay people are being advised that the volcanic eruption threat has passed for now… but volcanologists say the elevated level of risk remains.

A brief eruption late last night on Mt Tongariro resulted in a sizable fine ash cloud dispersing across Hawke’s Bay, and particularly in the north-west of the region. A layer of ash approximately 1mm in depth came to ground inland from Napier and north-east into the Wairoa area.

The latest assessment from GNS Science is that eruption activity is low level.

It is too early to predict the next series of events, but GNS Science expects heightened activity may continue for several weeks. The volcanic alert level for Tongariro volcano remains at alert level 2.

Hawke’s Bay CDEM Group Controller Ian Macdonald is urging people to ensure they are prepared in case of a further eruption and potential evacuation.

“People should have a getaway kit ready and emergency survival items to cope on their own for three days or more,” says Mr Macdonald.

“In particular volcanic activity can result in lengthy power cuts and people should make sure they have stocked up on torches and batteries and should be prepared to cook without electricity.”

He says anyone planning holidays to the affected area, particularly to the skifields should check the skifield websites and the GeoNet website (www.geonet.org.nz) prior to leaving home.

For the latest advice visit the HB CDEM website – www.hbemergency.govt.nz

 
7 August 2012, 2.30pmHawke’s Bay people are being advised that the volcanic eruption threat has passed for now… but volcanologists say the elevated level of risk remains. A brief eruption late last night on Mt Tongariro resulted in a sizable fine ash cloud dispersing across Hawke’s Bay, and particularly in the north-west of the region. A layer of ash approximately 1mm in depth came to ground inland from Napier and north-east into the Wairoa area. The latest assessment from GNS Science is that eruption activity is low level. It is too early to predict the next series of events, but GNS Science expects heightened activity may continue for several weeks. The volcanic alert level for Tongariro volcano remains at alert level 2. Hawke’s Bay CDEM Group Controller Ian Macdonald is urging people to ensure they are prepared in case of a further eruption and potential evacuation. “People should have a getaway kit ready and emergency survival items to cope on their own for three days or more,” says Mr Macdonald. “In particular volcanic activity can result in lengthy power cuts and people should make sure they have stocked up on torches and batteries and should be prepared to cook without electricity.” He says anyone planning holidays to the affected area, particularly to the skifields should check the skifield websites and the GeoNet website (www.geonet.org.nz) prior to leaving home. For the latest advice visit the HB CDEM website – www.hbemergency.govt.nz

 


 

Advising Caution for Ash Cloud Fine Particles
Tuesday 7 August 2012, 9.55am

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group advises caution to local people, in spite of current clear skies.

A brief eruption late last night on Mt Tongariro has resulted in a sizable fine ash cloud dispersing across Hawke’s Bay, and particularly in the north-west of the region. A layer of ash approximately 1mm in depth has come to ground inland from Napier and north-east into the Wairoa area. There is a noticeable sulphuric smell in the air around Napier-Hastings, advised by Taradale and Havelock North people.

Air quality reporting also shows increased levels of PM10 particulate matter readings at all three air monitoring stations in Awatoto, Marewa Park (Napier) and St Johns (Hastings).

Hawke’s Bay CDEM Group Controller Ian Macdonald asks schools, childcare centres and businesses to use their common sense, given the current clear skies. Unless ash is falling, it is safe to be outside.

“People with respiratory issues should be aware of the situation and may choose to stay inside,” said Mr Macdonald. “And where ash is visibly falling, people should remain indoors.”

HBCDEM Group has been in contact with Unison, other lifelines organisations and HB DHB, coordinating a potential response, particularly if the situation with Mt Tongariro deteriorates. It is not known if the single brief eruption will be the only event, and it is possible that other eruptions may follow.

Power supply should not be affected, unless a significant ash fall occurs. However, HBCDEM Group asks people to be prepared, particularly in the event of power outages.

Travel
Flights are currently suspended at Hawke’s Bay airport, and people should check with their airline to confirm travel plans.

State Highway 5, the Napier-Taupo road, is open, but people should check the NZTA or AA RoadWatch sites prior to any travel. Only those that need to travel using SH 5 should do so. Ash will scratch car windscreens if wipers are used. Wash off using clean water.

A further update will be issued before 5pm today.


Ash Fall Guidance
Disconnect your downpipe from water tanks, gully traps and gutters to prevent blockages and allow ash to empty on to the ground. It will also help protect your water supply if you rely on rainwater. When the ash has cleared, hose off your roof before reconnecting pipes.

Anyone caught in an ashfall should wear a dust mask designed to protect lungs from small particles. If no mask is available, use a damp handkerchief or cloth to cover your nose and mouth. Protect your eyes by wearing goggles or glasses – remove contact lenses. Seek shelter in a building or vehicle. Wash ash off your skin as soon as possible as it may cause irritation.

Water contaminated by ash will usually become unpalatable before it presents a health risk. Wait for the ash to settle and use the clear water.




Ash Cloud Alert for Hawke’s Bay
Tuesday 7 August, 4.20am
 

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group confirm that a volcanic eruption has occurred at Mount Tongariro

Hawke’s Bay CDEM Group Controller Ian Macdonald advises, ”We’re monitoring this situation closely, working with Ministry staff from Wellington and GNS.  Some ash fall is possible between the eruption site and west of Napier and we’ll update the public regularly, particularly as the situation changes.”

Light ash has been reported falling on State Highways 1 and 46 and as far East as State Highway 5 near Te Haroto.  Due to possible danger to the public Police have closed State Highway 1 between Rangipo and Waiouru (Desert Road) and State Highway 46 West of Rangipo.  SH47 and 4 remain open at his stage as does SH5. 

Motorists are being advised to avoid travel in the area and these closures will be re-assessed once daylight reveals the extent of the ash cloud and other related safety risks have been assessed.

People who live in the ash zone should disconnect their downpipes from water tanks, gully traps and gutters to prevent blockages and allow ash to empty on to the ground.  It will also help protect your water supply if you rely on rainwater.  When the ash has cleared, hose off your roof before reconnecting pipes.

A further release will be advised before 9am today.



Timely Reminder to be prepared

Wednesday 4 July 2012

Civil Defence Minister Chris Tremain says the earthquake centred off the Taranaki Coast on the 3 July 2012 is a timely reminder for New Zealanders to be earthquake prepared.

The magnitude 7.0 quake, which hit at 10.36 on the 3 July, was centred 60 kilometres south of Opunake, in Taranaki region, at a depth of 230 kilometres. It lasted more than 45 seconds and people described hanging on to doorways and diving for cover.

In fact the long rolling earthquake felt in Hawke's Bay is the type of shake that can trigger a tsunami.

Hawke’s Bay CDEM Group Emergency Management Coordinator, Lisa Pearse, says being felt in Hawke’s Bay as a weak, long rolling motion with a long duration she knew it was a large quake some distance away with the potential to generate a tsunami.
“People living on or near the coast should know that if a relatively weak, rolling earthquake hits and is of unusually long duration, like a minute or more they should evacuate to higher ground,” says Ms Pearse.

She says in the past it has taken more than 20 minutes before earthquake information comes through from official sources like Geonet, but its new rapid technology for internet and smart phones delivered information about last night’s quake within a couple of minutes.

“Because the quake was less than a minute and on the other side of the island we could quickly conclude it was safe to stay near the coast this time.”

This quake is another physical reminder to be prepared for something larger. Quakesafe your home as shown above, and for more details on being prepared visit www.gethru.govt.nz where people can also register to take part in New Zealand ShakeOut, a national earthquake drill on the 9:26am 26 September (9:26-26:9).

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Manager and Controller Ian Macdonald says this event, along with the recent Canterbury quakes, highlights the importance of planning for emergency events, particularly as a recent Hawke’s Bay survey found over 57% Hawke’s Bay businesses are underprepared in the event of a disaster.

Time and money spent on emergency preparedness is an investment. Planning and preparation by your business & farm before a disaster will minimize the loss of revenue and more importantly the loss of life.



Continuing to Monitor
Wednesday 4 April 2012, 4.30pm

Steady and persistent rain is likely to continue especially in the northern reaches of Hawke’s Bay, according to Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group.

There is some uncertainty as to the volume of rainfall still to be expected, however the worst effects of the current low pressure system are being felt in the boundary area of Gisborne District and Hawke’s Bay inland from the Mahia Peninsula. This rain is likely to continue into Friday and Saturday.

HB CDEM Group continue to monitor this event and are speaking regularly with local Councils and agencies across the region.

The coastal swell has dropped back to 2.0 to 3.5 metres, but will continue at this level through Saturday and Sunday, tapering off Monday and Tuesday.

HBCDEM Group still advices caution on the region’s roads. Check the NZTA and AA Roadwatch website for road closures, and look at the latest MetService forecast prior to travelling.

NZTA www.nzta.govt.nz
AA Roadwatch www.aa.co.nz
MetService www.metservice.co.nz



Wednesday 4 April 2012, 9.30am

Caution for Easter activities

Widespread rainfall continues to fall with and is expected to be heaviest in northern Hawke’s Bay.

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group met with Regional Council staff this morning to review overnight activity. While rain has been more consistent in northern areas of Hawke’s Bay, it is currently falling at a level which does not alarm authorities.

The message from HBCDEM Group’s Controller Ian Macdonald is for Hawke’s Bay people to consider what they plan to do over the coming Easter weekend.

“We don’t recommend camping or caravan-ing this weekend particularly around waterways and only the hardiest of hunters will be heading out there. Our recommendation for travellers is to check that roads are open, allow plenty of time and watch for slips on the region’s roads.”
“Everything is becoming super-saturated while this slow-moving low pressure weather system remains,” said Mr Macdonald.

Roads in particular to watch are:
Wairoa – local roads, check for closures
Napier - Taupo road: State Highway 5
Napier- Wairoa road: State Highway 2, at Devil’s Elbow
Bay of Plenty to Gisborne road, State Highway 2, in the Waioeka Gorge between Gisborne and Opotiki
Wairoa to Gisborne road, State Highway 2, in the Wharerata Ranges, north of Morere

The coastal swell in Hawke Bay is not expected to pose a significant threat to low-lying seaside communities, but the swell will remain through Easter weekend and coastal water will carry a lot of debris and stay cloudy for days to come.

HBCDEM Group cautions people to consider the roads they plan to use, checking the NZTA and AA Roadwatch website, and look at the latest MetService forecast. HBCDEM Group continues to monitor the situation.

NZTA www.nzta.govt.nz
AA Roadwatch www.aa.co.nz
MetService www.metservice.co.nz



Tuesday 3 April 2012, 4.15pm

Unpredictable weather for Hawke’s Bay

The watchword currently is “unpredictable” for Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group.

Eyes are on the region’s coastal settlements and river communities as the effects of sea swells and a low pressure system play out over the next few days. It is uncertain what level of impact Cyclone Daphne will have on the east coast.

HB CDEM Group is taking advice from MetService and Hawke’s Bay Regional Council’s science and asset teams to understand the likely impact of rain expected overnight Tuesday until midnight Wednesday.

Indications from HBRC are that some of the region’s rivers may get up to a 1-in-5 year river level. This means that floodwaters are likely to cover areas between stop banks. River levels will rise and fall quickly, and wet ground will make slips more likely.

“We’re expecting significant rain in the ranges from Takapau north, with 110 to 130 mm until midnight Wednesday, and a further 100 mm on Thursday” said Ian Macdonald, HB CDEM Group Manager.

“With this low pressure easterly system, the heavy rain will combine with an onshore swell and could be an issue for our low-lying coastal settlements during high tides.”

The swell is predicted to be 4-6 metres south of Kidnappers, 2-3m at Clifton/Te Awanga, 3-4.5 Haumoana to Waipatiki, 1-3m around Wairoa to Mahia and 4-6 around Mahanga. It is predicted to pick up overnight Tuesday and not ease until Saturday.

“We believe that, once again, northern Hawke’s Bay will take the brunt of the bad weather. We’re asking people to watch themselves, their families and neighbours, take appropriate action and be prepared,” said Mr Macdonald.

He said that farmers should consider moving stock from areas of their properties that are traditionally flood prone.

HB CDEM Group is meeting regularly to monitor and review the current situation.



Wednesday 21 March 2012, 4.15pm

More rain likely overnight

Staff from Hawke’s Bay Regional Council met on Wednesday afternoon to check on the status of the region’s rivers and drain and the forecasts for further rain for the region.

It is expected that another short sharp rainfall event affecting Hawke’s Bay will occur between midnight and 0800 Thursday in two separate bursts. This rainfall system is fast moving.

Surface flooding is possible with rivers continuing to flush out. Full river channels are expected to remain through the weekend. Farmers are reminded of the risk to stock of being near waterways during this event.

The HBRC Operations Group continues to monitor the drains and pumping stations, clearing build-up of weeds and other debris.

Soil will remain waterlogged and drivers are reminded to be cautious and watch for slips on roads.



Wednesday 21 March 2012, 9.10am

Rain eases but more on the way

Staff from Hawke’s Bay Regional Council met again this morning to check on the status of the region’s rivers and drains, which look to be handling this latest rainfall event.

While the situation is manageable, there is more rain on the way overnight Wednesday with a further system forecast for the weekend. However the indications are that both these rainfall systems are faster moving than what we’ve seen so far.

HBRC staff will meet again on Wednesday afternoon to review the current situation and advise if anything changes.



Tuesday 20 March 2012, 3pm

Wet in the Bay so take care

Staff from Hawke’s Bay Regional Council met this morning and advise that the current rainfall situation is not expected to pose a threat to people in the region.

HBRC staff have been in touch with each of the councils across the region. In spite of steady rain overnight, all rivers remain below a 1-in-5 year event level. There have been reports of surface flooding in Kopuawhara, Mahia where stream levels reached 5 year event levels. Local authorities report steady rain but no reported surface flooding problems as yet. HBRC staff continue to monitor the situation.



Friday 9 December 2011, 3pm

Earthquake Memories for Survivors Afternoon Tea

Plans are well underway for the 1931 Hawke’s Bay Earthquake survivor’s morning tea to be held again next year on Sunday 12 February 2012.

In the last few years, the event has become more popular as survivors of the Hawke’s Bay Earthquake have taken time to commemorate this dramatic event in their lives.

The afternoon tea will again be at Napier Boys High, starting at 2pm with doors open at 1.15pm.

The afternoon tea has some traditions including musical entertainment, a guest speaker on the history of the earthquake, and the cutting of the Mayor’s cake by the oldest and youngest survivors, before afternoon tea is served.

At next year’s event, there will be an opportunity for guests to meet up with people from their old neighbourhoods.

The event is organised by Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group with Napier City Council and Hawke’s Bay Regional Council as key organisers. Napier Boys High provides the venue and assistance and Red Cross and Art Deco Trust assist with registrations and afternoon tea.

The Hawke’s Bay Earthquake occurred on 3 February 1931 at 10.47 am. It was measured at 7.8 M on the Richter scale and was centred north of Napier. The quake lasted over 2 minutes and levelled churches, schools, offices and homes, and in Napier was followed by a fire that destroyed most of the central downtown area. 256 people died as a result of this event.


Thursday 10 November 2011, 5pm

Civil Defence exercise a great opportunity to test systems

The Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management team took part in a Pacific-wide tsunami exercise today along with similar emergency management groups from around the Pacific.

For New Zealand Exercise Pacific Wave 2011 focussed on a regional source tsunami originating in Vanuatu. While this scenario affected the west and east coasts of New Zealand to varying degrees, the larger impacts were on the West Coast.

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Manager Ian Macdonald says the scenario posed no risk to the region however it was a great opportunity to test communication systems between the various organisations involved.

Ian Macdonald says the exercise may prompt locals to think about their potential risk from tsunami and how they can prepare if disaster strikes. Hawke’s Bay Regional Council has developed tsunami hazard maps which highlight the level of risk from tsunami for different areas of the region and he encourages people to visit the Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management website – www.hbemergency.govt.nz .

Ian Macdonald says the latest mapping was completed in August. At that time there was a lot of information in local papers, so there is plenty of new information for the public to digest.

He says in a real civil defence emergency people are encouraged to listen to the radio and if they have access to a computer the Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management website would provide valuable regularly updated information as well.


Thursday 10 November 2011, 11.30am

Public encouraged to view tsunami hazards maps online

Hawke’s Bay people are being encouraged to view the latest tsunami hazard maps on the Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management website to help them prepare for a potential large tsunami.

The Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management team is taking part in a Pacific-wide tsunami exercise today with similar emergency management groups from around the Pacific for Exercise Pacific Wave 2011. The New Zealand component of the exercise will focus on a regional source tsunami originating in Vanuatu. This scenario will affect the west and east coasts of New Zealand to varying degrees, with the larger impacts on the West Coast.

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Manager Ian Macdonald says the exercise may prompt locals to think about their potential risk from tsunami and how they can prepare if a tsunami strikes. Hawke’s Bay Regional Council has developed tsunami hazard maps which highlight the level of risk from tsunami for different areas of the region and he encourages people to visit the Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management website – www.hbemergency.govt.nz .

Ian Macdonald says the latest mapping was completed in August so there is plenty of new information for the public to digest.

He says in a real civil defence emergency people are encouraged to listen to the radio and if they have access to a computer the Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management website would provide valuable regularly updated information as well.




Thursday 10 November 2011, 11.20am

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence team part of International exercise

The Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group is taking part in a Pacific-wide tsunami exercise today.

The team will join similar emergency management groups around the Pacific for Exercise Pacific Wave 2011.

The New Zealand component of the exercise will focus on a regional source tsunami originating in Vanuatu. While this scenario will affect the west and east coasts of New Zealand to varying degrees, the scenario has larger impacts to occur on the West Coast.

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Manager Ian Macdonald says during the last two years there have been several real tsunami and a number of exercises the team has responded to which has provided them with valuable experience that will be put to the test again today.

He says they will use the exercise to confirm communication systems in the new Hawke’s Bay Group Emergency Co-ordination Centre in Hastings.




Tuesday 16 April 2011, 4.05pm

New Group Manager for Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence

A new Group Manager for the Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management office has been appointed. Ian Macdonald will take up this newly created role and will also serve as the primary Group Controller in a regional scale event.

Hawke’s Bay has been working towards strengthening its Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group office over the past six months, and this appointment is a major step forward.

Ian will start in his new role in 5 September 2011 and will be based at Hawke’s Bay Regional Council for initially, before transferring to the dedicated emergency management centre located in Hastings which will house the regional civil defence group office.

Ian has been a manager at Hastings District Council for a number of years in land use planning and more recently, for strategic and community planning projects. During his time with the Hastings District Council, Ian has been involved in the management of a number of emergencies. Most recently he spent two weeks as part of the response and recovery operations related to the heavy rain event that devastated the Hawke’s Bay coast after Easter 2011.
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Ian is also active as a member of the NZ Army Reserve (Territorial Force) and holds the rank of Lieutenant Colonel being posted to Army General Staff, Wellington where he is responsible for the selection and career management of army reserve officers. As well as having a number of command appointments, he has attended and instructed at military staff colleges in New Zealand and Canada and has experience in training and exercise development. He also deployed to the Middle East for 12 months where he served with the United Nations in Israel, Syria and South Lebanon.



Thursday 7 July 2011, 9.25am

Tsunami Warning Cancelled

The tsunami warning has been cancelled for New Zealand. A marine threat warning is still in place.

A tsunami alert was issued earlier this morning following a large earthquake in the Kermadec Islands north of New Zealand.

Around a 20cm surge is now predicted.

Some currents and unusual tidal action may still occur in coastal areas for the next 48 hours.

People are still strongly advised to stay away from the coast as a precautionary measure.

The Regional Council is keeping recreational boat ramps in Napier’s Inner Harbour closed until further notice.

The Harbourmaster is monitoring the situation for commercial shipping at the Port of Napier and at sea.

The Regional Emergency Operations Centre will remain on watch. 


Thursday 7 July 2011, 8.45am

Tsunami Alert for Hawke's Bay

A tsunami warning has been issued for Hawke’s Bay and the East Coast which may affect coastal areas.

Strong currents and unusual tidal action is expected.   A ‘wall of water’ is not expected but the tsunami effect could be up to 1 metre or higher.

The tsunami is expected soon after 9 am.

People are strongly advised to stay away from the coast. 

Boaties with boats in the inner harbour are advised to check moorings and take any precautions necessary.  Boat ramps in Napier’s inner harbour are closed. The Regional Council is also liaising with Coastguard to contact any vessels off the coast of Hawke’s Bay.

The Port of Napier is being alerted about the situation. Harbourmaster is requesting that commercial shipping leave the port. 

The Regional Emergency Operations Centre is activated.



Thursday 12 May 2011 

Still danger at Central Hawke’s Bay beaches

Dead stock and unstable slips are just two reasons to be very careful when accessing Central Hawke’s Bay beaches especially Pourerere, Aramoana, Parimahu and Blackhead beaches after the recent major flood event.

Central Hawke’s Bay District Council Emergency Management Officer, Bruce Kitto, said that people were trying to go for walks or attempting to take their vehicles along the beaches which could be very dangerous.

“We can’t stop people from going to these beaches, however, there are unstable slips to negotiate, dead stock, and piles of driftwood which pose a hazard. We’re worried that people may get caught in unfamiliar surroundings and stranded by incoming tides or land movement. We’re advising people to just keep clear of those places until things are safe.”

Central Hawke’s Bay District Council has been working with the East Coast Rural Support Trust, MAF, Ministry of Social Development, and HB Regional Council to support the people hardest-hit in the floods.

A Central Hawke’s Bay Mayoral Relief Fund has been set up and donations may be made by contacting Council on 06 857 8060.

Farmer support Information: East Coast Rural Support Trust

Mike Barham md.ee.barham@xtra.co.nz
Mobile: 027 582 8443
Landline: (06) 877 3930

General Support Information:

Central Hawke’s Bay District Council 06 857 8060
Victim Support 8589 140 (Waipukurau Police) or 0800 842 846
Work & Income New Zealand0800 559 009
EQC – 0800 DAMAGE (0800 326 243)



Saturday 30 April 2011 6:41pm

WAIROA TOWNSHIP WATER SUPPLY

No Returning to School on Monday for Wairoa Township Pupils

Wairoa District Council has advised the Ministry for Educationthat due to the water supply problems that are currently being experienced, schools in the Wairoa township will need to closed.

So there is no returning to school on Monday for Wairoa township pupils – this also applies to kohanga reos, kura kaupapa, kindergartens and childcare centres.

People heading back to work on Monday in the township will also be affected by the loss of water supply.

Wairoa District Council engineers and contractors arecontinuing to work on the pipeline and temporary arrangements are in place to continue supply to householdsuntil the pipeline is fixed.

Council would like people to continue to conserve water, avoid unnecessary ablutions, doing the laundry, putting on the dishwasher and consider their home water storage options.

Sunday Water Supply Arrangements for Wairoa Residents

For Sunday 1 May 2011 water will be pumped into the township supply network to allow residents to replenish household water stores and carry out general household tasks at the following approximate times.

- Sunday morning – between 7am and 9am
- Sunday morning – between noon and 1pm (this will rely on replenishment of the boundary tanks)
- Sunday evening – between 6pm and 8pm

A water tanker will be based at the Clyde Hotel carpark on Queen Street for residents wanting to top up their household water supplies as the following times:

- Sunday morning – from 10am to 12noon
- Sunday afternoon – from 3pm and 5pm

Since the tanker can carry only a set amount of water, Council advises that rationing of no more than 20 litres per person will be allowed.

Council would still like people to continue to conserve water, avoid unnecessary ablutions, doing the laundry, putting on the dishwasher and consider their home water storage options.

Portaloos have also been placed outside the public toilets at Clyde Court and River Parade west for general use.

In the meantime, Council engineers and contractors are continuing to work on the break in the pipeline

Wairoa  Residents Urged to Switch Off Hot Water Cylinders

Wairoa District Council is advising people to switch off hot water cylinders to avoid burning out the heater.

For residents who have a header tank in the roof – there is no issue.

For residents who have NO header tank in the roof, SWITCH OFF the hot water cylinder as there may not be water in the cylinder and there is a possibility that the element may be burned out.

For more information phone Wairoa District Council on 838-7309.



Saturday, 30 April 2011 1:00pm

Work Continuing on Fixing Wairoa Township Water Supply Pipe

Wairoa township is experiencing a loss in water supply due to a break in the main pipeline cause by a severe slip.

Wairoa District Council engineers and contractors arecontinuing to work on fixing the damage to pipeline. Wairoa District Council is currently arranging for tankers to replenish water tank supplies.

There is sufficient storage within township water tanks but households and businesses will be experiencing a significant loss in pressure with many households experiencing a complete loss of water.

There is likely to be ongoing issues with the water supply until further notice.

Wairoa District Council is advising people to converse water,avoid unnecessary ablutions, doing the laundry, putting on the dishwasher and consider their home water storage options.

For more information phone Wairoa District Council on 838-7309.

Keep listening to this radio station for further announcements.

USEFUL LINKS 
http://www.getthru.govt.nz



Saturday 30 April 2011 9:17am

Damage to Wairoa Township Water Main

Residents of Wairoa are asked to conserve as water as they can after damage to the towns water main early this morning.

Wairoa District Council staff are working to establish a replacement water supply.

People should take all steps for water hygiene, including boiling water if they have any concerns. There will be an update soon.



Friday 29 April 2011 5:00pm

Recovery Activities under way in Hawke’s Bay

After a battering from the rain bomb earlier this week, attention has now turned from initial response to recovery in the coastal areas of Central Hawke’s Bay, Wairoa and Hastings Districts.

Recovery managers have been appointed for Central Hawke’s Bay, Wairoa and Hastings Districts. The State of Emergency declared in Central Hawke’s Bay on Thursday morning was being reviewed at 4.30pm this afternoon. The role of recovery managers will be to prioritise and work through recovery issues including operational challenges, the people and equipment required to fix roading and access, infrastructure, services and utilities.

No further weather alerts have been issued by MetService although occasional showers are possible over the next couple of days.

Coastal roads in that area are still under mud, slips and water. Many slips remain fluid including some near private residences and other buildings. All coastal communities have some form of vehicular access, except Aramoana Beach. The only people remaining in coastal communities are those permanent residents who don’t require evacuation.

Power has been restored to all coastal communities, however the Waimarama power supply will be shut down from 0930am until approximately 12.00 midday on Saturday.

A ‘boil water’ notice remains in place for people at Waimarama.

People travelling in Hawke’s Bay, particularly near coastal areas should watch for greasy or uneven roads, and allow extra time given the repairs that are under way.

Health advice can be gained from either the www.hbemergency.govt.nz or www.hawkesbaydhb.govt.nz websites.

ROADS
Wairoa
- SH2 Napier-Wairoa - Open with extreme caution
- Roads closed at this stage are:
- Kopuawhara Road
- Nuhaka - Opoutama Road and Blacks Beach (one lane only with delays)
- Kinikini Road (Open to 4WDs)
- Mahia East Coast Road at Burma Hill (open to 4WDs)
- Mangaone Road
- Nuhaka River Road
- Hereheretau Road at fords
- Mangapoike Road at 7.5km
- Kokohu Road
- Waiatai Road
- Tunanui Road (open to 4WDs)
- Maromauku Road

Napier City
- No issues

Hastings District
- Ocean Beach Road: Cleared , but still closed until washed of silt tomorrow morning. Restricted access from afternoon Saturday 30 April. Extreme caution necessary
- Waimarama Road: Temporary bridge in place. Road has been reopened for residents and emergency service vehicles. Road is singe lane in many parts and slippery. Extreme caution necessary. Te Apiti road closed.
- Maraetotara Road: Road has been reopened for residents and emergency service vehicles. Road is singe lane in many parts and slippery. Extreme caution necessary.
- Te Apiti Road: closed due to slips. Contractors started clearing slips. Expect to open to limited access for residents and emergency services midday Saturday [30 April]
- Waitangi Road: Closed other than first 500 metres.
- All other council roads are open but many are single lane with slips and subsidence. In particular extreme caution on Waipatiki, Tangoio and Aroapaonui Roads
- The camping grounds at Clifton and Te Awanga are closed and unlikely to be reopened for some time.

Central Hawke’s Bay
- Manned roadblocks are in place to Kairakau, Pourerere, Blackhead and Mangakuri Beaches.
- Entry through roadblocks is by written permission from CHB Controller only until further notice, due to safety issues with partially cleared roads and unstable land behind many coastal communities.



Thursday 28 April 2011, 11:43am

Rain Easing but Emergency still in place

A state of emergency was declared in Central Hawke’s Bay District at 7.30 this morning due to the severe impacts of flooding over the past two days in the coastal communities of Central Hawke’s Bay.

The response efforts are being lead by Central Hawke’s Bay District Council Civil Defence in conjunction with Emergency Services. The Hawke’s Bay Group Emergency Centre has been activated in support, with further support from the National Crisis Management Centre in Wellington.

Heavy rain warnings have been lifted for Hawke’s Bay. From 9am Thursday to 9am Friday the rain is forecast to clear in southern coastal areas. Between 25-40mm of rain is expected from Napier northwards during this period. With these low intensities river levels will continue to recede. Weather conditions for the weekend are expected to be cloudy with occasional showers.

The emphasis now is on recovery. The southern coastal communities of Central Hawke’s Bay have been the most seriously affected areas with multiple road closures and extensive damage caused by river flooding. An aerial assessment of the situation from Kairakau to Blackhead has been taking place on Thursday morning.

In other areas of Hawke’s Bay the Hastings District and Napier City Councils are dealing with the weather-related situations within their areas. Overnight a large slip on Breakwater Road, Napier required the evacuation of 18 homes with 5 people using the welfare centre. The New Zealand Transport Agency is working to clear the slip.

There are also significant impacts on the coastal communities of Waimarama and Ocean Beach, with roads, bridges, water supplies, power and telecommunications affected. Telecom have advised that services to 206 customers in Waimarama have been disrupted. This includes access to 111 emergency services as well as normal services. There is also significant impact on private property including farms and farm fences. Now that the rain has stopped, efforts are underway to restore road links, water and other infrastructure. Appropriate assistance to the community, including the farming community, is also being investigated.

A fatal road crash has closed SH2 south of Waipukurau until around midday when police complete their investigations. Detours are in place.



Thursday 28 April 2011, 9:03am

State of Emergency in Central Hawke’s Bay

A state of local emergency was declared for Central Hawke’s Bay District at 7.30 this morning due to the severe impacts of flooding over the past two days in the coastal communities of Central Hawke’s Bay.

The Hawke’s Bay Group Civil Defence Emergency Management Group (CDEM) has been activated to support Central Hawke’s Bay, particularly in the areas of welfare, media support and planning. The National Crisis Management Centre in Wellington has also activated in support of the Hawke’s Bay region.

A situation update will be available at 10am.



Wednesday 27 April 2011, 5:35pm

The Big Wet Continues for Hawke’s Bay

Hawke’s Bay is well and truly wet, but the Regional Council advises there is still more rain to fall over the coming days.

Coastal areas have been particularly hard hit, with evacuations from Nuhaka, Te Awanga, Ocean Beach, Clifton and Waimarama. Some bridges are under water or washed out along with slips and surface flooding in many places.

Council staff will be working through the night monitoring the situation, also manning fixed and mobile pumps, with a digger and truck on call if required. The Hawke’s Bay Regional Council Emergency Operations Centre is active, as are those of Hastings District and Central Hawke’s Bay. Other councils are active and monitoring the situation should it change.

From 6.00pm Wednesday to midday Thursday, expect continued rainfall throughout Hawke’s Bay with up to another 70mm in the coastal communities south of Cape Kidnappers; up to another 40mm inland in Central Hawke’s Bay; and up to another 100mm in the Wairoa catchment. Although there have been no swell warnings issued, the significant wave height is currently 3.7m (Port of Napier), with a period of 10 seconds. This has the potential to cause damage to exposed coastal locations.

Depending on rainfall levels, minor streams and tributaries will rise and fall quickly. However the region’s main rivers are not expected to pose a problem.

People in affected areas should stay at home where possible, avoid unnecessary travel and be wary of possible soil movement and further slips.

POWER & WATER

- Waimarama power out overnight; water treatment plant also without power.
- Known power outages at Kairakau, Mangakuri, Southern Pourerere Beach, Aramoana, and Blackhead.

ROAD CLOSURES & ACCESS

WAIROA DISTRICT
- State Highways north and south (SH2 and SH38) have been reopened.
- SH2 Wairoa to Gisborne has been open all day there may be patches of silt/debris where there has been surface flooding.

HASTINGS DISTRICT
- SH5 Napier to Taupo remains open
- SH2 Napier to Wairoa is open - two lanes have been restored, worst affected areas are White Pine Bush/Devils Elbow area. Roads are likely to be slippery, expect areas of surface water
- Ocean Beach Road marginal access (slip)– closed overnight.
- Clifton Bridge, Te Awanga closed, camping ground isolated
- Waimarama Road closed due to slip and bridge approach washout.
- Maraetotara Road closed

NAPIER
- Surface flooding across Napier with substantial ponding at Bay View
- No issues with access, although some slips and debris around Napier Hill - barriers are in place where needed.

CENTRAL HAWKE’S BAY 

There is currently no road access to the coastal communities of:

- Kairakau
- Mangakuri
- Pourerere
- Aramoana
- Blackhead
- Te Paerahi
- Porangahau
- Whangaehu

And the inland communities of:

- Omakere
- Elsthorpe
- Long Range



Wednesday 27 April 2011, 1:08pm

Continuing Wet Weather Challenges Hawke’s Bay

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Group is carefully monitoring the significant rainfall that the region is still experiencing.

From Nuhaka to Porangahau, 14 coastal communities have been adversely affected by heavy continuing rainfall which has created surface flooding and slips, closing a number of rural access roads within the region and State Highway 2 between Napier and Wairoa.

Rainfall ranges from a ‘1 in 5 year’ to over a ‘1 in 100 year’ event. The high tide passed at 12.45pm today with ocean swells of between two to three metres.

Most of the current concern is with smaller streams and tributaries, which have the ability to rise and fall very quickly. The region’s main rivers are all contained and are expected to remain contained. However, Metservice predict an additional 100 – 150 mm rain near the ranges and coastal hills of Hawke’s Bay through to Wednesday evening, which is likely to cause the rivers to rise again.

The soil is now water-saturated and people should keep an eye on areas that may pose a landslide risk.

Emergency Operations Centres throughout the region are already dealing with or ready to assist with evacuation and welfare needs.

EVACUATIONS

- Clifton & Te Awanga – 61 people were evacuated
- Waimarama – 25 people were evacuated
- Ocean Beach – 15 people were evacuated
- Nuhaka – 4 displaced people were relocated

FIRE/ AMBULANCE

- Dealing with multiple road closures, flood and slip events but within current capabilities.

FLOODING SUMMARY

Most of Hawke’s Bay region has received between 30mm and 200mm of rain in the past 24 hours with the area north of Nuhaka in the Wairoa District receiving just over 207mm in 24 hours.

- Mahia
: Kopuawhara Stream reached its 50yr peak overnight - widespread flooding on the lower flats occurred in the Mahia isthmus.
- Nuhaka: very high river levels on the Nuhaka and Tunanui Rivers.
- Whakaki: local flooding from debris build-up on bridge at Te Ramarama Stream.
- Wairoa: Wairoa River peaked just above 5yr level overnight - no reports of significant problems.
- Mohaka to Esk: no reports of problems.
- Bay View: reports of surface flooding on Rogers Road.
- Napier: Reports of minor surface flooding in many parts of city.
- Meeanee: Waitangi Stream overflowing near McLeod Road.
- Clive: East Clive reports of surface flooding.
- Haumoana: Hastings District Council addressing any issues.
- Te Awanga: Maraetotara River over-topped right bank upstream of Clifton Road bridge - water flowing over farmland; flooding in Te Awanga along Kuku, Pipi, Leyland Roads; water flowing down into campground - several houses and campers evacuated.
- Waimarama: Puhokio Stream over-topped its banks and flooded several houses in the early morning - 20 people evacuated to Waimarama Fire Station.
- Pourerere: Reports of flooding through houses - self evacuating.

NAPIER CITY – ACCESS

- Widespread rural ponding at Bay View, but otherwise no access issues

HASTINGS DISTRICT - ACCESS

- Ocean Beach Road closed – due to slip Ocean Beach settlement isolated
- Ellis Wallace Road Bridge closed
- SH2 Flooding closed at Whirinaki. Flooding at Pan Pac Mill.
- Bridge Aropaonui Beach
- Waipatiki Beach Road closed due to slips. Settlement isolated.
- Tangoio Settlement Road closed due to slips
- Pakuratahi Road closed due to slip
- Clifton Bridge, Te Awanga closed, camping ground isolated
- Tukituki Road closed due to slip
- Waimarama Road closed due to slip
- Okaihau Road – slips.
- Te Apiti Road – unable to access past Brightwells.
- Tia Kitai Road – unable to access.
- 32 Cedar Road.
- Maraetotara Road – bridge at top is submerged. Slips between water tank to creek. Creek flooded.
- Slip on Hedgeley Road – just passable. 2 Slips within 200m of State Highway 5 - not passable by car.
- Airini Road. Bridge at ramp abutments washed away; power poles down.
- Black Bridge – Possible issue; Police to investigate.
- Middle Road Havelock North - tree blocking road

WAIROA DISTRICT - ACCESS

- Wairoa Airport has closed due to surface flooding
[the following roads are closed due to surface flooding]
- SH2 south of Wairoa closed until further notice
- Kiwi Road at SH2 and SH38 intersections
- SH38 near Ohuka / Ardkeen
- SH38 at Clifton Lyall Road
- Mangapoike Road – SH38 end
- Kokohu Road
- Kotare Road
- Nuhaka River Road
- SH38/ Frasertown Road – between Wairoa to Frasertown
- Kaiwaitau/ Keil Road

CENTRAL HAWKE’S BAY - ACCESS

There is limited access to the following coastal communities:

- Kairakau
- Mangakuri
- Pourerere
- Aramoana
- Blackhead
- Te Paerahi
- Porangahau
- Whangaehu



Wednesday 27 April 2011, 9:32am

Continuing Wet Weather Challenges Hawke’s Bay

Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Group has the picture of continuing rainfall, waterlogged groundwater and rising river levels.

Most of Hawke’s Bay region has received between 30mm and 200mm of rain in the past 24 hours with the area north of Nuhaka in the Wairoa District receiving just over 207mm in 24 hours. A possible 80-120 mm of rain may fall over the next 24 hour period and a high tide due at 1.00pm is creating some concern for those living near the coast and coastal rivers. Rivers are expected to remain at their higher than normal levels until late Thursday/early Friday.

After rainfall which continued through the night, surface flooding has been widely reported and 45 people evacuated from flooded properties at Te Awanga and Waimarama. The Hastings Disctrict Council Emergency Operations Centre activation at 7.00am this morning; the Regional Council Emergency Operations Centre has also activated.

Rain is still falling and may continue at the rate of 15-20mm per hour. Pumping stations are all operating effectively and mobile pumps are being moved to areas of greatest need. Overland drains are full and while the region’s Councils don’t anticipate severe urban flooding, localised flooding is occurring in low-lying, coastal and rural areas and is likely to continue until the rain stops. Surface flooding has been reported across Napier, in Bayview, Pourerere and Kairakau with more severe flooding in Wairoa and isolation for the community at Nuhaka.

Anyone with concerns for their property should contact their local council, who can provide advice and assistance if required.

Most of the region’s major roads are currently open, with the exception of the State Highway 2 [Napier-Wairoa] Road, and access towards Waimarama across the Maraetotara Road bridge. Other remote bridges to the north and in central Hawke’s Bay are likely underwater.

People who are concerned should listen to the television or radio for updates and avoid unnecessary travel, particularly into flooded areas.

The Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Group is actively monitoring the situation and will advise updates as appropriate.

KNOWN ROAD CLOSURES & ACCESS

Ocean Beach Road closed – due to slip Ocean Beach settlement isolated
Ellis Wallace Road Bridge closed
SH2 Flooding closed at Whirinaki
Bridge Aropaonui Beach
Waipatiki Beach Road closed due to slips
Waipataiki Beach settlement isolated
Tangoio Settlement Road closed due to slips
Pakuratahi Road closed due to slip
Clifton Bridge, Te Awanga closed, camping ground isolated
Tukituki Road closed due to slip
Waimarama Road closed due to slip
Okaihau Road – slips
Te Apiti Road – unable to access past Brightwells
Tia Kitai Road – unable to access

Hiranui
Pourerere
Elsthorpe
Bush Road
Moutere
Long Range
Blackhead
Pourerere Beach
Mangakuri



Tuesday 26 April 2011

Wet Weather across Hawke’s Bay

Hawke’s Bay Regional Council advises people that it’s going to stay wet for the rest of the week.

The region is currently experiencing pockets of heavy rain, up to 30mm an hour, which may cause localised surface flooding.
River levels will rise as the volume of water flows out from the ranges.
Gusts of wind may also damage trees and power lines, and could make driving hazardous, so keep up to date on the weather and avoid unnecessary travel.

The Regional Council continues to monitor the situation and will advise updates as and when the situation changes.



Wednesday 30 March 2011

New emergency siren for coastal communities - Hastings District Council

A new Civil Defence emergency warning system is to be trialled again in the coastal communities of Haumoana, Te Awanga and Clifton this Sunday.

In the event of an emergency, vehicles would be equipped with a siren and loud speakers and travel around the roads of the communities, broadcasting the Civil Defence sting followed by a voice message.

Civil Defence Controller Mike Maguire says “the new warning system has been developed after the communities approached Council over concerns about receiving warnings of an impending tsunami”.

“ A system was borrowed from the Wellington City Council in September last year for a test at Haumoana school and the information obtained from that exercise has been used in the design of the local unit” Mr Maguire says.

“The new portable system is to undergo further testing outdoors, between 11am and 1pm on Sunday April 3rd with the sting and voice message expected to be heard at a range of 300 metres from the vehicle”.

Mike Maguire says “mobile systems are more cost effective, as they are cheaper to establish and have low ongoing maintenance costs, compared to fixed installations which are exposed to the elements. A voice message combined with a siren tone also caters for visitors to the area, where fixed tone siren only systems do not”.

Once the effectiveness of the new warning system has been determined, more systems are expected to be built, giving greater coverage around the Hastings district.

Civil Defence wants residents in the coastal communities to report on the effectiveness of the warning system following the test on Sunday, by going to www.hastingsdc.govt.nz and following the Civil Defence link, or by filling out and returning the leaflet which was placed in letterboxes.




Friday 25 February 2011 

Siren test timely after recent devastation

The devastation in Canterbury and Japan is a morbid reminder to be as prepared as possible for a natural disaster – after all, it’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when.

It is timely then, that Napier Civil Defence has once again teamed up with the New Zealand Fire Service to test the city’s 16 sirens on Sunday, April 3, (daylight saving weekend) – the same time people are urged to check their smoke alarm batteries and emergency survival kits, change their stored water and of course change their clocks.

The sirens will sound (turn on and off) at 12-noon for approximately five minutes. Upon hearing the siren, turn your radios on and listen to a Hawke’s Bay Radio Station (i.e. Classic Hits 89.5FM, 92.7 More FM, Newstalk ZB 1278AM, National 101.5FM or Radio Live 1368AM). Listen for the Civil Defence broadcast message which will be read by the radio announcer. This is what you should do if ever you hear the sirens.

“Earthquakes and tsunamis are at the forefront of everybody’s minds at the moment so the siren testing comes at a good time,” Napier Civil Defence Manager, Angela Reade says. “It cannot be reiterated enough to people that they need to ‘Get Ready and Get Thru’.”

Angela warns that there are no assurances that everyone will hear the sirens, as any number of factors may reduce the effectiveness of the siren noise.

“Other loud noises, wind, distance from the siren location, elevation and topography may affect the siren noise output. It is possible that some residents in Esk Valley, Poraiti, Taradale and Meeanee may not hear the sirens.”

When the siren system is tested Civil Defence wants to avoid residents and visitors to the city becoming alarmed or frightened. They seek the public’s assistance to inform neighbours about the siren test and what is going to happen.

“Of most concern are residents who may be located within 250 metres from the siren location. The noise generated by the siren will be loud and people with sensitive hearing should avoid being directly exposed to the siren for too long,” Angela says.

NZ Fire Service Area Commander, Ken Cooper, says that ensuring smoke alarms have working batteries by testing the alarms at daylight saving is vital.

“Smoke alarms have saved thousands of lives in New Zealand,” Ken says. “If there is a fire in your home, smoke alarms could be the difference between life and death for your family.

Install smoke alarms in every bedroom, living area and hallway. Test your smoke alarm regularly. Day light saving is an excellent time to test and replace batteries.”

People are also urged to add one more thing to their “Get Ready” list and that is to sign up for Napier Civil Defence text alerts if they haven’t done so already. The texting service was introduced last year and is an additional way of alerting the public that there is a Civil Defence emergency. Those signed up will receive a text explaining the type of emergency and what action should be taken. The texting service will be tested at each daylight saving changeover. To sign up go to www.napier.govt.nz type in cdtxtalerts, and follow the simple steps.

Following the siren test residents will be asked to complete a survey on the effectiveness of the test. This can be done via the Napier City Council website www.napier.govt.nz or by filling out the survey in the Napier Mail on 30 March or 6 April. You will then be entered into a prize draw to win some great prizes.

Whatever you do, now is the time to prepare for a natural disaster. Are you ready?



CHRISTCHURCH EARTHQUAKE MEDIA RELEASES

23 February 2011 - Hawke's Bay District Health Board - Hawke's Bay Helping Christchurch Hospital, PDF File - 44Kb

23 February 2011Hawke's Bay District Health Board - Hawke's Bay Helping Christchurch Hospital Update 2, PDF File - 44Kb 

28 February 2011 - Hawke's Bay District Health Board - Christchurch Earthquake Response from Hawke's Bay District Health Board, PDF File - 45Kb

2 March 2011 - Hawke's Bay District Health Board - Help for those who have moved to Hawke's Bay from Christchurch, PDF File - 46Kb

4 March 2011Wairoa District Council - Red Cross Displaced Person Registration Available at Wairoa District Council, PDF File - 20Kb




Friday 25 February 2011

Hawke's Bay CDEM personnel to help earthquake response

Five Hawke’s Bay emergency operations logistics staff will be going to Wellington today to assist the National Crisis Management Centre with their logistics functions for the Canterbury earthquake response.

The staff going are: Te Aroha Cook from Central Hawke’s Bay District Council, Carol Gilbertson and John Keenan from Hawke’s Bay Regional Council, and Des Jane and Russell McCracken from Wairoa District Council. The staff will work in Wellington for up to 5 days.

Corinne Hamlin from Wairoa District’s building inspectors team will also be deployed to Christchurch on Sunday. Angela Reade and Monique Hewitt from Napier City civil Defence have been working in Christchurch for the past two days.
Another 3 staff are on standby if required: Bruce Kitto [CHBDC], Tim Allan [WDC] and Charlotte Drury [HBRC].

“We were impressed by the willingness of our skilled Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management personnel to volunteer to help with the response to the Canterbury quake. They will gain invaluable experience that can not normally be offered through regular training, experience they will bring back and share with other staff here in the Bay,” said Nigel Simpson, Hawke’s Bay Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Coordinator.

The National Crisis Management Centre has thanked all staff who offered their skills. The National Centre co-ordinates assistance to Canterbury and will manage deployment of available staff from all regional CDEM groups during the response and recovery operation.


Thursday 24 February 2011

If Hawke’s Bay people want to give to Christchurch – GIVE CASH


Hawke’s Bay Regional Council’s Chairman, Fenton Wilson, has reinforced the message for people wanting to help Cantabrians: “Give cash”.

“Cash is the easiest and most effective way to help those impacted by Tuesday’s earthquake and those still recovering from the September 2010 Canterbury earthquake,” he said.

Several relief funds are up and running.

A “Christchurch Mayoral fund” has been set up and donations can be made to BNZ bank account: 02-0800-084958-000. The Red Cross is accepting donations for their 2011 Earthquake Appeal at their ASB account 12-3192-0006848-01. People can give to the Salvation Army appeal and there are donation funds running at all the major banks.

Hawke’s Bay CDEM Group Coordinator Nigel Simpson said that Hawke’s Bay people are generous and want to help with relief efforts for the national state of emergency in Canterbury.

“Our thoughts are with the people of Christchurch and Canterbury at this time and the best way we can help is to give cash now and provide what Christchurch needs when they ask for it,” he said.

He says that the management of people assisting with the specific disaster recovery skills needed, is being carefully done to ensure there is no extra burden on the limited water, food and accommodation resources in Canterbury.

More than 100 staff from 9 Hawke’s Bay organisations – councils, government organisations and service agencies - have combined to offer a range of skills to assist at Emergency Operations Centres or with maintaining local government services.
“These staff may be used as required in essential areas, and may be valuable in later stages of the recovery to relieve staff who will need a break,” said Mr Simpson.

Hawke’s Bay staff from NZ Police, NZ Fire Service, NZ Defence Force, District Health Board and Public Health are also contributing to their national organisations’ responses with deployment of staff to support the Christchurch response operation.

Mr Simpson reminds everyone in Hawke’s Bay that it’s time to take stock and be sure we are all prepared enough for an earthquake or other disaster. Having at least some water and food stored, first aid material, a family plan on where you will meet up and what you will do, and a battery powered radio and torches (with spare batteries ready).

“As we have seen and heard from this disaster, information becomes paramount for you to know what to do for your safety, and with the power out, an agreed plan of action plus a transistor radio and a torch will be a great help.”

Anyone wanting to know what they should do to be prepared at their workplace or home can get information from www.hbemergency.govt.nz or ask your local council for brochures.

People in New Zealand concerned about the wellbeing of friends and relatives in Christchurch should call 0800 REDCROSS (0800 733 276).


Wednesday 7 July 2010, 8:00am

SEVERE WEATHER WARNING - Situation Update 0800 hrs

Roads

State Highway 2 Napier to Wairoa is closed due to major slips in the Devils Elbow and Waikouau Hill areas and minor slips elsewhere.

The road is expected to remain closed for most of the day and earliest estimates for its re-opening are 1400-1600 hours Wednesday 7 July 2010.

Listen to the radio for more information or before setting out check -

Rivers, rainfall and flooding issues

Hawke’s Bay Regional Council river level monitors have triggered annual alarm levels at 5 sites – Ruakaturi, Wairoa River, Hangaroa (all in the Wairoa district), Mangaone Stream at Rissington (inland from Napier) and the Esk River at Berry Road. 

Rainfall in the region over the past few days has been significant in some areas with average figures of:

Hill country in Mahia area   250-300mm
Kotemaori and Waikaremoana 180-210 mm
Wairoa 100mm
Ruahines 100-160mm
Southern Hawke’s Bay 50mm but up to 150mm on coastal hills

MetService have advised that a deep low centred east of Gisborne is moving slowly southwards.

The strong southeast flow over the North Island is expected to turn south to southwest today.   Rain has eased this morning over much of Hawke’s Bay. However a weather warning is maintained for the area north of Tutira where rain will still be heavy at times today with a further 40-60mm possible. Further rain is also possible between 1800 hrs Wednesday and 0000 hours Thursday in Central Hawke’s Bay.

Coastal

The weather system means that the following swells may be expected:

South of Cape Kidnappers –4-5 metre south –easterly swell continuing until weekend
Haumoana/ Te Awanga area – 2-3 metre swells until the weekend
Mahia – south facing coasts – potentially 5-6 m swells overnight on Thursday


Tuesday 6 July 2010, 3:00pm

SEVERE WEATHER WARNING - Situation Update 1500 hrs

Roads

State Highway 2 Napier to Wairoa has reopened as debris was cleared to improve drainage from Lake Tutira.  However any heavy rainfall periods may boost water levels in Lake Tutira and cover SH2 again.

There is still a likelihood of fresh slips and debris on both State Highway 2 Napier-Wairoa and State Highway 5 Napier- Taupo. 

Extreme caution when driving is needed and any unessential trips should be avoided.
Listen to the radio for more information or before setting out check -

Rivers, rainfall and flooding issues

Hawke’s Bay Regional Council river level monitors have triggered annual alarm levels at 4 sites – Ruakaturi, Wairoa River, Hangaroa (all in the Wairoa district) and Mangaone Stream at Rissington (inland from Napier). 

MetService have advised that another flux of heavy rain is moving south, and areas south of Napier (coastal and inland) are likely to experience increasingly heavy rainfall overnight.

Rivers are expected to keep rising throughout the region.  

The Wairoa River is expected to reach an annual flood level but stay within its channel.  However if rainfall intensifies overnight in the catchment, the Wairoa River may flood SH2 near the town.

Coastal

An easterly swell means Hawke’s Bay Regional Council and Hastings District Council Civil Defence are monitoring Haumoana, Te Awanga and Clifton coastal communities because of a history of erosion and waves overtopping residential areas and roads.     Easterly swells of 2.5-4m are expected to reduce as the weather system turns to a southerly, but on Thursday 5-7m southerly swells may impact Mahia beaches and beaches south of Cape Kidnappers.


Monday 5 July 2010, 4:30pm

SEVERE WEATHER WARNING

A heavy rain warning for Hawke’s Bay from Tuesday and Wednesday means that flooding and slips are likely, advises Hawke’s Bay Regional Council.

The region’s soils are already wet, so rivers are expected to rise quickly.

Regional Council staff will be on duty monitoring rainfall and river levels.

The heaviest rainfall is predicted for inland Wairoa, Tutira and the Napier-Taupo highway.  Over the next two days, heavy rain of 200-300mm is expected in the ranges and 100-150 mm in coastal areas north of Napier.  South of Napier rainfall of 140-180mm in the hills and 60-90mm along the coast are expected.

Rainfall is expected to become heavy during Monday night, and during Tuesday and Wednesday rainfall intensity of 20mm per hour is possible. 

It is possible that flood waters may come across roads, and drivers need to take care and check for road closures before setting out.  Areas that may be affected are SH2 near Wairoa and SH38 into Waikaremoana around Wairoa-Ardkeen.

Regional Council staff will closely monitor rivers and rainfall in Wairoa especially, and liaise with the District Council which relies on monitoring to alert them of flood risks on the plains near the township.  

Farmers who lease grazing areas alongside all the main rivers are being advised that they should move stock. 

Heavy swells are also likely to impact on coastal areas. While there are neap tides at the moment, there is a storm surge of approx 200mm which means heavy swells at high tide are likely to cause damage especially Haumoana - Clifton.  Swell predictions are for approx 4m easterly swells at Haumoana, but turning SE as the event passes, with 5 – 7 m swells impacting the southern Hawke’s Bay beaches.

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